Christ and the Word of Christ, Together

“There is such a connection between the evangelical truth of God and Jesus Christ, that they have both one name, to insinuate to us that as we will be partakers of Christ, so it must be of Christ, as he is revealed in the gospel, not in conceits of our own. The word is truth, and Christ is truth. They have the same name; for were there never so much mercy and love in God, if it were concealed from us, that we had nothing to plead, that we had not some title to it by some discovery of it in his will, the word and the seal of the word, the sacraments (for the sacrament is but a visible word, they make one entire thing, the word and sacraments; the one is the evidence, the other the seal), what comfort could we take in it? Now his will is in the promise, wherein there is not only a discovery of what he doth or will do, but he hath engaged himself: ‘If we believe, we shall not perish, but have life,’ John iii. 15; and ‘Come unto me,’ Matt. xi. 28, and be refreshed, saith Christ. Every one that thirsts, come and be satisfied, John vii. 37. And now we may claim the performance of what he hath spoken, and bind him by his own word. ‘He cannot deny himself,’ John vii. 37. So now we see him comfortably in the glass of the word and sacraments.” -Richard Sibbes, Glorious Freedom

 

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Circumcision and Baptism

“Just as circumcision was the mark of grace in the Old Covenant, baptism is the mark of grace in the New Testament, the mark of God on those who are his. As Covenant signs, circumcision and baptism speak of the promises of God and symbolize the donation of those promises to authorised candidates, but, as promises, they only modulate into the spiritual realities of which they speak by the sovereign decision of God and the exercise of personal faith.” -Alec Motyer, A Christian’s Pocket Guide to Loving the Old Testament

‘Take And Eat’ Brought Sin, In Christ It Bestows Salvation

“the language ‘take and eat,’ which Christian recite at the Lord’s Supper it is impossible not to recall the later use of this pair of verbs. ‘She took… and ate.’ ‘So simple the act and so hard the undoing,’ someone has said. ‘God will taste poverty and death before ‘take and eat’ become words of salvation.'” -D.A. Carson