Life as Church

Whenever you’re there, you’re supposed to be opening up your life so God can give you common ground with people who are not like you. This is where we live out the gospel. The gospel is supposed to bring people together who wouldn’t naturally be together. That’s the nature of it. “ – Eric Mason

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Mission is the mother of theology

“Mission is the mother of theology.” -Martin Kahler

John Drury explains, “What he [Kahler] meant by this is that the early church first began to theologize (explicit reflection on its teaching) in response to the missional encounter of the gospel in new cultures. In other words, the early Christians embedded their claims into the language and mind-set of its pagan mission field in order to bring them into the fold. Such mission-driven theology can be seen at work specifically in the intertwining of Greco-Roman culture and the Hebrew Scriptures, first in an incipient form in the New Testament and later in the full-blown synthesis of Trinitarian and Christological doctrines.

http://www.drurywriting.com/john/drulogion%20-%20Mission%20is%20the%20Mother%20of%20Theology%2011.9.05.htm

Illustrations: Partnership in the Gospel

“William Carey of England, who has been called “the father of modern missions,” went to India in 1793. At that time, there were no organized missionary societies, but as Carey prayed over the needs of an unreached world, God laid India on his heart. At a “commissioning” service for Carey and his colleague in March 1793, one of Carey’s friends exclaimed, “There is a gold mine in India but it seems almost as deep as the centre of the earth!” to which Carey replied, “I will venture down but remember that you must hold the ropes.” How did Carey expect his friends to “hold the ropes”? It was to be through a partnership in prayer and in giving. Those who hold the ropes are just as important in the partnership as those who go down into the mine. Holding the ropes for others is a significant part of biblical fellowship; it is essential for the spread of the gospel.” -Jerry Bridges, True Community

Maybe It Is Our Fault That Christianity Seems ‘Narrow’

“It may be said simply that the Christian way of salvation is narrow only so long as the Church chooses to let it remain narrow. The name of Jesus is discovered to be strangely adapted to men of every race and of every kind of previous education. And the Church has ample means, with promise of God’s Spirit, to bring the name of Jesus to all. If, therefore, this way of salvation is not offered to all, it is not the fault of the way of salvation itself, but the fault of those who fail to use the means that God has placed in their hands.” -J. Gresham Machen, Christianity and Liberalism