Vulnerable Birth

“The second person of the Trinity was conceived and born needing the care of a mother. To be human is to be vulnerable, but to be a baby is to be vulnerable in a manner we spend a lifetime denying. Indeed Jesus was a baby refusing to forego the vulnerability that would climax in his crucifixion. And as such, Jesus was entrusted to the care of Mary and Joseph. They could not save him from the crucifixion, but they were indispensable agents to making his life possible.” -Stanley Hauerwas

BTW NOTE: “Indispensable” is difficult word to use here. Could God have sent his Son differently? Yes, probably, but by sending him in the way that he did, Christ identified with true human beings who are dependent creatures from birth.

Advertisements

Glory To, Glory For, Glory In

“It is staggering for me to perceive that the Lord Jesus Christ is the glory of the Lord revealed to us. It is more staggering to grasp that he is the glory of the Lord revealed for us. It is most staggering of all to understand that he is the glory of God revealed in us. “Christ in you, the hope of glory.”” -John MacArthur

Incarnation & Hardship

“For the Son of God to empty himself and become poor meant a laying aside of glory; a voluntary restraint of power; an acceptance of hardship, isolation, ill-treatment, malice, and misunderstanding; finally, a death that involved such agony— spiritual, even more than physical— that his mind nearly broke under the prospect of it. It meant love to the uttermost for unlovely men, who “through his poverty, might become rich.” This Christmas message is that there is hope for a ruined humanity— hope of pardon, hope of peace with God, hope of glory— because at the Father’s will Jesus Christ became poor and was born in a stable so that thirty years later he might hang on a cross. It is the most wonderful message that the world has ever heard, or will hear.” -J. I. Packer

The Key Text on the Incarnation?

“The key text in the New Testament for interpreting the incarnation is not, therefore, the bare statement in John 1: 14, “the Word became flesh and made his dwelling among us,” but rather the more comprehensive statement of 2 Corinthians 8: 9, “you know the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, that though he was rich, yet for your sakes he became poor, so that you through his poverty might become rich.” Here is stated, not the fact of the incarnation only, but also its meaning; the taking of manhood by the Son is set before us in a way that shows us how we should set it before ourselves and ever view it— not simply as a marvel of nature, but rather as a wonder of grace.” -J. I. Packer

He Played Fair

“For whatever reason, God chose to make man as he is— limited and suffering and subject to sorrows and death— he [God] had the honesty and the courage to take his own medicine. Whatever game he is playing with his creation, he has kept his own rules and played fair. He can exact nothing from man that he has not exacted from himself. He has himself gone through the whole of human experience, from the trivial irritations of family life and the cramping restrictions of hard work and lack of money to the worst horrors of pain and humiliation, defeat, despair, and death. When he was a man, he played the man. He was born in poverty and died in disgrace, and thought it was worthwhile.” -Dorothy Sayers