Cultural Observation: The Worry Epidemic

Advertisements

Worry Doesn’t Do Much

“Even when he became gravely ill while traveling, the letters he wrote from the road revealed a teasing, tender sweetness. In 1546, on the way home from a conference with the dukes in Eisleben,

Luther wrote: To the saintly, worrying Lady Katherine Luther, doctor at Zulsdorf and Wittenberg, my gracious dear wife: We thank you heartily for being so worried that you can’t sleep, for since you started worrying about us, a fire broke out near my door and yesterday, no doubt due to your worry, a big stone, save for the dear angels, would have fallen and crushed us like a mouse in a trap. If you don’t stop worrying, I’m afraid the earth will swallow us.” [Bainton, Women of the Reformation]

Michelle DeRusha, 50 Women Every Christian Should Know

Cultural Observation: Millennials Struggle With Imposter Syndrome…Like A Lot

http://www.forbes.com/sites/christinecarter/2016/11/01/why-so-many-millennials-experience-imposter-syndrome/#5828d3863d40

BTW NOTE1: This is why the proclamation of grace in Christ–that God knows everything about us, even the very worst, yet accepts us completely because of Christ’s person and work– is a message that will resonate with millennials.

BTW NOTE2: The article also has some interesting insights on social media’s ability to spark feeling of inferiority in people (so social media becomes like the Law), and also has some fascinating stats related to worry and anxiety. 

False Hopes, Wrong Kingdom

“Your hope is absolutely attached to what kingdom you are serving. If your life is defined by how many of your little kingdom purposes you can realize, you will tend to be stressed, controlling, anxious, disappointed, and fearful. You have defined your life by what you cannot control and by what God has not promised. Sadly, it is all very self-defeating. But if your hope no longer rests on your personal wisdom, strength, and character, if it no longer rests on the acceptance and performance of other people, and no longer rests on the belief that circumstances, institutions, and situations will not fail you, then you are beginning to move toward reliable hope.” -Paul Tripp