“Radically ordinary hospitality may resemble the social-gospel practices of liberal churches and non-Christian mercy communities, for radically ordinary hospitality engages in some of the same practices: we gather people in close, we feed and clothe the poor, we accept people where they are, we care for the needs of the body, and we seek to restore the dignity of each human being. But here is the big difference: radically ordinary hospitality practiced by biblical Christians views struggling people as image bearers of a holy God, needing faith in Christ alone, belief in Jesus the rescuer of his people, repentance of sin, and covenant family within the church. Bible-believing Christians do not believe that a shave and a meal help people in the long run-or atone for the sin nature of us all.” – Rosaria Butterfield, The Gospel Comes with a House Key

Advertisements

Mission is the mother of theology

“Mission is the mother of theology.” -Martin Kahler

John Drury explains, “What he [Kahler] meant by this is that the early church first began to theologize (explicit reflection on its teaching) in response to the missional encounter of the gospel in new cultures. In other words, the early Christians embedded their claims into the language and mind-set of its pagan mission field in order to bring them into the fold. Such mission-driven theology can be seen at work specifically in the intertwining of Greco-Roman culture and the Hebrew Scriptures, first in an incipient form in the New Testament and later in the full-blown synthesis of Trinitarian and Christological doctrines.

http://www.drurywriting.com/john/drulogion%20-%20Mission%20is%20the%20Mother%20of%20Theology%2011.9.05.htm

If Christianity were genuinely taken to heart

“It should be uncontroversial… to say that if the teachings of Christianity were genuinely to take root in human hearts–if indeed we all believed that God is love and that we ought to love our neighbors as ourselves– we should have no desire for war, should hate injustice worse than death, and should find indifference to the sufferings of others impossible.” -David Bentley Hart